Express Flu Shot Clinics

Convenient appointment times, minimal waiting, contactless registration.

Are you ready to fight the flu?

The health and safety of our patients is of utmost importance to us. This year, to help keep our patients as safe as possible in our centers, we will be offering No-Cost* Flu Shots during scheduled Express Flu Shot Clinic hours below for our Connecticut centers. The benefits of having designated Express Flu Shot Clinics:
  • Minimize time spent inside the center – Minimal wait times during Express Flu Shot Clinic hours
  • Contactless registration – Register online for a scheduled Flu Clinic by using the links below
  • Dedicated Exam Rooms – Express Flu Shot Clinic patients will be seen in designated exam rooms during the scheduled clinic hours

Flu Shot Clinic Schedule – Please check back as we will be adding more Express Flu Shot Clinics!
Please click the ‘Register Here’ link to make an appointment during the Express Flu Shot Clinic of your choice. 

Our New York centers (Mamaroneck, Mohegan Lake and Somers) are offering walk-in and online registration for flu shot appointments at this time. Select the location nearest you and check in online

Tuesday, October 27
All clinics 2:00pm to 7:00pm
Glastonbury, CT: Register Here
West Hartford, CT: Register Here

Friday, October 30 
All clinics 2:00pm to 7:00pm
Southbury, CT: Register Here

Saturday, October 31
All clinics 10:00am to 3:00pm
Groton, CT: Register Here

Sunday, November 1
All clinics 10:00am to 3:00pm
Norwalk, CT: Register Here
Newtown, CT: Register Here

 

We are anticipating being presented with unprecedented challenges due to the confluence of the COVID-19 pandemic and the 2020/2021 flu season. The flu shot is the first line of defense to protect yourself from a dangerous flu season this year. Don’t wait! The season is in full swing by November, and it can take up to two weeks for the antibodies in the flu vaccine to help build up immunity against the virus in your system. Don’t take chances with the flu this year. Protect yourself and your loved ones with a flu shot.

Questions About the Flu Shot? We Have Answers!

Is the flu shot safe? 
Yes. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends everyone over the age of 6 months** receive a flu vaccine at the start of each flu season.

Can I walk in to get my flu shot, or make an appointment online for a the flu-shot only visit this year?
To help keep patients safe in our centers, we are offering flu shots during our scheduled Express Flu Shot Clinics. If there is not an Express Flu Shot Clinic scheduled in your area, please find a PhysicianOne Urgent Care center near you to schedule your appointment to receive the flu shot.

I already got a flu shot and need to cancel my Express Flu Shot Clinic appointment. How can I do that?
We understand how busy life gets. If you need to cancel your Express Flu Shot Clinic appointment, please do so within 24 hours of the scheduled Flu Shot Clinic. To cancel online, log into your Solv profile created at the time of scheduling and select “Cancel Appointment”. Or, you can call the center directly to cancel. Please keep in mind that by making an appointment for the Express Flu Shot Clinic, a flu vaccine is being reserved for you. If you need to cancel, we want to be able to open appointments to vaccinate as many patients as possible during these unprecedented times. If you cancel less than 24 hours before the scheduled Flu Shot Clinic, you will be charged $25 for the cost of the flu vaccine. Thank you for understanding!

Flu and COVID-19

What is the difference between Influenza (Flu) and COVID-19?
Influenza (Flu) and COVID-19 are both contagious respiratory illnesses, but they are caused by different viruses. COVID-19 is caused by infection with a new coronavirus (called SARS-CoV-2) and flu is caused by infection with influenza viruses. Because some of the symptoms of flu and COVID-19 are similar, it may be hard to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone, and testing may be needed to help confirm a diagnosis. Flu and COVID-19 share many characteristics, but there are some key differences between the two. While more is learned every day, there is still a lot that is unknown about COVID-19 and the virus that causes it.

 Will there be flu along with COVID-19 in the fall and winter?
While it’s not possible to say with certainty what will happen in the fall and winter, CDC believes it’s likely that flu viruses and the virus that causes COVID-19 will both be spreading. In this context, getting a flu vaccine will be more important than ever. CDC recommends that all people 6 months and older get a yearly flu vaccine.

 Can I have flu and COVID-19 at the same time?
Yes. It is possible have flu, as well as other respiratory illnesses, and COVID-19 at the same time. Health experts are still studying how common this can be.

Some of the symptoms of flu and COVID-19 are similar, making it hard to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone. Diagnostic testing can help determine if you are sick with flu or COVID-19.

Is COVID-19 more dangerous than flu?
Flu and COVID-19 can both result in serious illness, including illness resulting in hospitalization or death. While there is still much to learn about COVID-19, at this time, it does seem as if COVID-19 is more deadly than seasonal influenza; however, it is too early to draw any conclusions from the current data. This may change as we learn more about the number of people who are infected who have mild illnesses.

 Will a flu vaccine protect me against COVID-19?
Getting a flu vaccine will not protect against COVID-19, however flu vaccination has many other important benefits. Flu vaccines have been shown to reduce the risk of flu illness, hospitalization and death. Getting a flu vaccine this fall will be more important than ever, not only to reduce your risk from flu but also to help conserve potentially scarce health care resources.

 Does a flu vaccination increase your risk of getting COVID-19?
There is no evidence that getting a flu vaccination increases your risk of getting sick from a coronavirus, like the one that causes COVID-19.

Who should get their flu vaccine during the COVID-19 pandemic?
Annual flu vaccination is recommended for everyone 6 months of age and older, with rare exceptions, because it is an effective way to decrease flu illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, reducing the overall burden of respiratory illnesses is important to protect vulnerable populations at risk for severe illness, the healthcare system, and other critical infrastructure. Thus, healthcare providers should use every opportunity during the influenza vaccination season to administer influenza vaccines to all eligible persons, including;

  • Essential workers: Including healthcare personnel (including nursing home, long-term care facility, and pharmacy staff) and other critical infrastructureworkforce
  • Persons at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19: Including adults aged 65 years and older, residents in a nursing home or long-term care facility, and persons of all ages with certain underlying medical conditions. Severe illness from COVID-19 has been observed to disproportionately affect members of certain racial/ethnic minority groups
  • Persons at increased risk for serious influenza complications: Including infants and young children, children with neurologic conditions, pregnant women, adults aged 65 years and older, and other persons with certain underlying medical conditions

Should a flu vaccine be given to someone with suspected or confirmed COVID-19?
No. Vaccination should be deferred (postponed) for people with suspected or confirmed COVID-19, regardless of whether they have symptoms, until they have met the criteria to discontinue their isolation. While mild illness is not a contraindication to flu vaccination, vaccination visits for these people should be postponed to avoid exposing healthcare personnel and other patients to the virus that causes COVID-19. When scheduling or confirming appointments for vaccination, patients should be instructed to notify the provider’s office or clinic in advance if they currently have or develop any symptoms of COVID-19.

Additionally, a prior infection with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 or flu does not protect someone from future flu infections. The best way to prevent seasonal flu is to get vaccinated every year.

When does flu season start?
We see cases of flu all year long, but the flu “season” starts when cases begin to increase, typically by November and lasting through March.

When should I get vaccinated?
The CDC recommends getting vaccinated in the fall, before the end of October. It can take up to two weeks for the antibodies in the vaccine to develop to protect the body from flu, so it is a good idea to get vaccinated early.

Can I  get the flu from the vaccine? 
No. Most people do not have any side effects from the flu vaccine, but on occasion some may experience mild side effects like a sore arm where the shot was administered, or a low grade fever. These side effects are not symptoms of the flu, and the flu vaccine does not cause the flu. It can take up to two weeks before the antibodies in the vaccine build up to protect you from the flu. If you have been exposed to the flu virus before the vaccine can take effect, you may fall ill with flu. This is why it is so important to make sure you are vaccinated early!

I am allergic to eggs. Can I still get the flu vaccine?
If you have an allergy to eggs, it is best to consult your allergist and/or Primary Care Provider before getting vaccinated. However, the CDC does note that those who have experienced only hives after exposure to egg can get “any licensed flu vaccine that is otherwise appropriate for their age and health”. You can reference the full CDC information on vaccines and egg allergies here.

 

 

*Patients with private insurance will have their flu vaccine billed through their insurance, and there will be no co-pay unless otherwise required by their plan. The cost for a flu shot for uninsured patients is $25. Medicaid (including Husky and CT, NY, and MA state) patients under 19 years of age cannot receive a flu vaccination at PhysicianOne Urgent Care. Please call 1.855.349.2828 with any specific questions. 
In Connecticut, PhysicianOne Urgent Care will only administer the flu vaccine to privately insured patients five (5) years of age and older, due to laws related to the Connecticut Vaccine Program. In Massachusetts and New York, PhysicianOne Urgent Care will only administer the flu vaccine to children 6 months of age and older.

Health News + Events

Are Smokers at Higher Risk for COVID-19?

If you are a smoker, you may be wondering if you’re at greater risk of contracting COVID-19. Although there haven’t yet been any studies providing a conclusive answer to this q  Read More

The Difference Between Strep Throat & COVID-19

If you’re experiencing a sore throat, you’re probably concerned about what’s causing it. Less than a year ago, a simple sore throat usually wouldn’t be much cause for conce  Read More

How to Protect Yourself From COVID-19

In these stressful times, COVID-19 prevention is at the forefront of almost everyone’s minds. Whether you have been working outside your home throughout the pandemic, or you’re  Read More

What Our Patients Are Saying

Rating 4.4
Rating 4.2
Rating 4.6
Rating 5.0

"The overall care I received was excellent! I also appreciate your affiliation with Yale New Haven Hospital."

Patient
Derby, CT

"Throughout the visit I felt like the staff really cared. The Doctor took his time talking with me about my symptoms, and I felt like he listened to all my concerns and took that into consideration when recommending the right treatment. Thank you!"

Patient
Hamden, CT

"I had to take my son in for an ear infection following a sudden change in temperament at daycare. He was inconsolable the entire car ride but when we got there and by the time we left this care facility he was back to his normal happy go lucky little two year old boy. I highly recommend PhysicianOne Urgent Care."

Patient
Westwood, MA

"I wanted to take a moment to thank you for the attention you gave me last week. My son was started on antibiotics and ear drops. Within 24 hours he began to feel better. The poor kid had been going to school in tears because he was afraid of missing any more days, but feeling (and looking) just awful! He's not been able to even think about lacrosse practice, but thanks to starting him on antibiotics, he was thrilled to return to practice today."

Patient
Somers, NY