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Summer Travel Safety During COVID

With COVID-19 still in our communities, is it safe to travel this summer?

Dr. Jeannie Kenkare, our Chief Medical Officer and Co-founder, shares helpful information on how to stay safe and healthy this summer when traveling.

1. Road Trips: Try to limit stops which would put you at risk for coming into close contact with other people and places where surfaces are frequently touched by others.

  • If you are frequenting “rest stops”, make sure we wear your mask, avoid touching surfaces that could harbor the virus (like door handles, bathroom door locks, toilet flush handles and sink faucets).
  • If you must touch those surfaces, make sure you wash your hands for at least 20 seconds with soap and water or use hand sanitizer before touching anything else.

2. Hotel or Rental Property? Small may be better in this scenario. Large hotels host larger volumes of people, and could put you at greater risk than smaller options such as private rental properties or smaller establishments.

  • If you do stay in a hotel, any place that other hotel guests are gathered are the highest risk places and should be avoided – such as at the check-in desk, hotel bar or at the pool.
  • Room service is probably safer than eating in the hotel restaurant since you have contact with less individuals.

3. Clean it Up: It’s a good idea to bring along disinfecting wipes (with bleach), disposable gloves (you should wear them when disinfecting surfaces) and enough alcohol-based hand sanitizer to last through the duration of your trip.

  • In your hotel or rental property, before settling in, sanitize the surfaces that are frequently touched by others, such as door handles, touch pad kiosks, light switches and bedside countertops in hotel rooms and common areas; and in the bathroom(s), clean the toilet handle and sink faucets as well.

While you’re away, continue to practice social distancing by keeping at least 6 feet from people who are not in your own household and continue to wear a mask if you must be closer than 6 feet or are indoors amongst other people (even if you are each 6 feet apart).

Most importantly: ENJOY the summer. Following the above recommendations and staying aware of your surroundings when traveling will help keep you and your family safe. Just don’t forget to enjoy your time when you’re away; fresh air and a positive attitude help keep us healthy as well!

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