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Halloween Safety Tips

Halloween Safety TipsHalloween is a magical time for children. Unfortunately, it is also fraught with serious dangers that can have life-long consequences. To make sure your child enjoys a safe, healthy holiday, consider the following tips for safer trick or treating.
Safety Tips for Trick or Treating
• Be sure to cross every street at the corners, using crosswalks and traffic lights.
• Before crossing, look left first, then right, and the left again.
• Do not wear earbuds or look at your smartphone while walking.
• Walk on the most direct routes with the fewest street crossings.
• Always use paths or sidewalks, when they are available. If none are present, walk on the side of the street facing oncoming traffic.
• Keep an eye out for turning vehicles or cars backing out of driveways.
• Teach kids never to dart between parked cars or out into roadways.
• Adults should accompany all children under the age of 12.
• Avoid unfamiliar areas or neighborhoods that are not well lit.
• Trick or treat in groups if possible.
• Teach kids to make eye contact with drivers before attempting to cross in front of running vehicles.

Costume Safety Tips

• Try to choose costumes that stand out. If a costume is especially dark, carry a bright, reflective bucket or bag for treats.
• Make sure masks do not obstruct a child’s vision, and avoid baggy costumes that might cause kids to trip.
• Have children carry a flashlight or glow stick in case they need light.
Driving Tips for Halloween
• Drive slowly and stay alert while moving through residential neighborhoods.
• Expect children to behave in unpredictable ways when trick or treating.
• Take an extra moment to ensure that medians, curbs and intersections are clear.
• Carefully enter and exit alleys and driveways, watching closely for passing kids.
• Eliminate distractions from inside your vehicle.
• Be alert during popular trick-or-treating hours, between 5:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m.

Checking Candy

• Do not allow children to snack on candy while trick or treating.
• Examine every treat, looking for potential signs or tampering.
• Look for potential choking hazards and remove these from the remaining candy.
• If your child has a peanut allergy, carefully inspect the ingredients of all candy.
• Try to apportion your child’s treats for the days or weeks following Halloween.

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